From the KAWC Newsroom

Victor Calderón

San Luis Businesses Benefit From Both Sides of Border

Panchita's restaurant and bakery in San Luis, Ariz. is a family-owned business that has been serving hot breakfast and champurrado, Mexican hot chocolate, for a quarter century. They are open from 2 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

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On Tuesday evening, the Music Modernization Act (renamed the Orrin G. Hatch Music Modernization Act at the 23rd hour — in honor of the retiring Utah politician who also happens himself to own a platinum record), was passed unanimously in the Senate, as it was earlier this year by the House. In an age where political and artistic consensus is increasingly found only in cultural warrens populated by the like-minded, the bipartisan support of the bill is perhaps a small beacon of unity. (But still.)

Late in the fourth quarter of last weekend's Denver Broncos football game, the Broncos were well-positioned for a win. The team trailed the Oakland Raiders 19-17, but Denver was in comfortable range to score a field goal.

But strangely, for an 18-second period, Denver was a long shot, 750-1 underdog to win the game on the bookmaker FanDuel.

Today, an interview with Berkeley Economist Ulrike Malmendier, who has done pioneering work on the psychological effects of living through different economic events — and specifically the effect on our behavior and our willingness to take risk. Based on that work, what were the likely effects of the financial crisis, for us and for the economy?

North Korea announced today that it will permanently close a major missile test site. Kim Jong Un, the North's leader, said the site would be dismantled in the presence of international inspectors.

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Conservationists have developed a new high-tech strategy to trace the cartels that smuggle much of the illegal ivory around the world — by using DNA to track ivory back to specific ports.

Biologist Samuel Wasser from the University of Washington is behind the effort. He notes that while poaching in Africa has dipped recently, too many elephants are still dying.

"Right now we're estimating that there are about 40,000 elephants being killed every year," he says, "and there are only 400,000 left in Africa. So that's a tenth of the population a year."

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In Pyongyang today, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean leader Moon Jae-in shook hands on a deal, a deal that might get denuclearization back on track after talks stalled with the U.S. this summer.

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