From the KAWC Newsroom

Federal Immigration Agents Separated More Migrant Children Than Previously Thought

For nearly a year before family separation became an official and controversial policy of the Trump administration in the spring of 2018, federal immigration agents separated "thousands" of migrant children from their parents. That's according to a government watchdog report released Thursday. "OIG found more children over a longer period of time were separated by immigration authorities and referred to HHS for care than is commonly discussed in public debate. How many more children were...

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The partial government shutdown is now in its fifth week. And if nothing changes come Friday, hundreds of thousands of federal workers will miss another paycheck.

For three days last week, thousands of Guatemalans blocked roads and major highways to protest the Central American country's slide toward a constitutional crisis. The protest organizers included groups that have long demanded justice: indigenous communities and campesinos, as rural and farm workers are called.

Updated at 8:21 p.m. ET

Mariano Rivera, the New York Yankees' closing pitcher who posted a record 652 saves over his 19-year career, is the first player to be unanimously selected for Major League Baseball's Hall of Fame.

Two other pitchers, the late Roy Halladay and Mike Mussina, and slugger Edgar Martinez were also elected.

Rivera received all 425 votes cast by the Baseball Writers Association of America. The stars all received at least 75 percent of the ballots cast. Players must be retired for five years to be eligible for the honor.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The partial government shutdown is now in its fifth week. And if nothing changes come Friday, hundreds of thousands of federal workers will miss another paycheck.

Among those federal workers, FBI agents. The FBI Agents Association says without funding, that important counterterrorism, drug and child abuse investigations are stalled.

Thomas O'Connor is president of the association, which advocates for more than 14,000 former and active FBI special agents. And he joins me now. Mr. O'Connor, welcome to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The partial government shutdown is now in its fifth week. And if nothing changes come Friday, hundreds of thousands of federal workers will miss another paycheck.

Among those federal workers, FBI agents. The FBI Agents Association says without funding, that important counterterrorism, drug and child abuse investigations are stalled.

Thomas O'Connor is president of the association, which advocates for more than 14,000 former and active FBI special agents. And he joins me now. Mr. O'Connor, welcome to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The partial government shutdown is now in its fifth week. And if nothing changes come Friday, hundreds of thousands of federal workers will miss another paycheck.

Among those federal workers, FBI agents. The FBI Agents Association says without funding, that important counterterrorism, drug and child abuse investigations are stalled.

Thomas O'Connor is president of the association, which advocates for more than 14,000 former and active FBI special agents. And he joins me now. Mr. O'Connor, welcome to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The partial government shutdown is now in its fifth week. And if nothing changes come Friday, hundreds of thousands of federal workers will miss another paycheck.

Among those federal workers, FBI agents. The FBI Agents Association says without funding, that important counterterrorism, drug and child abuse investigations are stalled.

Thomas O'Connor is president of the association, which advocates for more than 14,000 former and active FBI special agents. And he joins me now. Mr. O'Connor, welcome to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The partial government shutdown is now in its fifth week. And if nothing changes come Friday, hundreds of thousands of federal workers will miss another paycheck.

Among those federal workers, FBI agents. The FBI Agents Association says without funding, that important counterterrorism, drug and child abuse investigations are stalled.

Thomas O'Connor is president of the association, which advocates for more than 14,000 former and active FBI special agents. And he joins me now. Mr. O'Connor, welcome to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The partial government shutdown is now in its fifth week. And if nothing changes come Friday, hundreds of thousands of federal workers will miss another paycheck.

Among those federal workers, FBI agents. The FBI Agents Association says without funding, that important counterterrorism, drug and child abuse investigations are stalled.

Thomas O'Connor is president of the association, which advocates for more than 14,000 former and active FBI special agents. And he joins me now. Mr. O'Connor, welcome to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

It's a meeting of two truly American pastimes: football and lawsuits.

First, the football.

Late in regulation in Sunday's NFC championship game, the New Orleans Saints were tied 20-20 with the Los Angeles Rams in pursuit of the Super Bowl.

~~~~~https%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2FForTheWin%2Fstatus%2F1087126552184184832~~~~~~

As the ball sailed toward Saints receiver Tommylee Lewis, Rams cornerback Nickell Robey-Coleman knocked into Lewis, appearing to make helmet-to-helmet contact. Officials called no pass interference or helmet-to-helmet penalties.

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