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Ducey declares Yuma County shipping container walls complete

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Office of Governor Doug Ducey
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One of five border barricades constructed of 8,800 pound shipping containers

Yuma, Ariz. (KAWC) - Governor Doug Ducey declared Yuma County safer Wednesday while announcing work on five gaps in the border wall is now complete.

Governor Ducey took to Twitter to show off some of the completed sections.

He said it only took 43 workers 11 days to fill the gaps.

They used 130 shipping containers to create nearly 4,000 feet of barricades.

In his official statement the governor writes:

“Following a historic investment in this year’s state budget, forged in partnership with legislative leaders, we’ve taken a major step forward to secure our border,” said Governor Ducey. “Five wide open gaps in the border wall near Yuma neighborhoods and businesses are now closed off. In just 11 days, Arizona did the job the federal government has failed to do — and we showed them just how quickly and efficiently the border can be made more secure – if you want to.”

The governor issued an emergency declaration early in the morning on August 12th.

Work on the make-shift wall began almost immediately.

By Monday workers had sealed a gap in the border wall outside Gadsden.

The state has plans to erect similar barriers at six other sites along the border.

Governor Ducey put the price tag for the project at $6 million, but media reports indicate, with installation it will cost more than twice that much.

Funding came from a $350 million border security package passed by the state legislature earlier this year.

The emergency order to build the barriers came just two days after Sen. Mark Kelly, (D-Arizona), announced the federal government was opening bids on contracts to permanently fill gaps in the border wall.

Lisa Sturgis’ return to KAWC brings her journalistic career full circle. Uncle Bob Hardy gave Lisa her first exposures to reporting back in the 1980s. She went on to spend more than three decades in TV news before making the decision to come home to NPR.