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Poll shows majority of Arizonans support some form of legal abortion

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Lisa Sturgis/KAWC
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An overwhelming majority of Arizonans believe abortion should be legal under some circumstances.

A recent poll from OH Predictive Insights shows 91% of likely registered voters surveyed said they did not support a total ban...and 64% said the issue would influence the way they voted.

Predictably, results were different for members of different parties.

81% of Democrats told pollsters a candidate’s stance on abortion would impact their vote, but only 15% of Republicans found the issue that important.

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OH Predictive Insights
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A majority of those between the ages of 18 and 34 also said the issue influenced their voting decisions.

While 76% of younger voters expressed strong support for abortion rights, they tend to skip midterm elections.

OHPI’s Mike Noble tells KAWC, they’re not expected to have a major impact in November.

However, it’s a different story for women voters.

“The power of abortion this year could be attributed to the voting strength of women, who are registered to vote and turn out to vote in higher numbers than men across the country," says Noble.

68% of women surveyed, regardless of party, said the issue would impact how they voted.

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OH Predictive Insights
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OH Predictive Insights

Noble says their influence cannot be ignored.

“With the reinstatement of the abortion ban from 1864 taking effect recently, the data shows sentiment on this issue among key voting blocs could be a deciding factor when they arrive at the ballot box this November.”

OHPI surveyed 829 registered voters from across the state of Arizona for its poll.

Lisa Sturgis’ return to KAWC brings her journalistic career full circle. Uncle Bob Hardy gave Lisa her first exposures to reporting back in the 1980s. She went on to spend more than three decades in TV news before making the decision to come home to NPR.