Ashish Valentine

Ashish Valentine joined NPR as its second-ever Reflect America fellow and is now a production assistant at All Things Considered. As well as producing the daily show and sometimes reporting stories himself, his job is to help the network's coverage better represent the perspectives of marginalized communities.

Valentine was born in Mumbai, India, and immigrated to the United States as a child. Before working in public media, he spent two years in northern France teaching high school English. He joined NPR from Chicago member station WBEZ, where he produced two daily news shows and worked on an award-winning joint WBEZ-City Bureau series investigating racialized disparities in home mortgage lending in Chicago.

Valentine speaks fluent French and is a graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he studied English Literature.

The tools of the Internet, and a bit of public embarrassment, can go a long way in drawing attention to a cause.

Front-line workers at grocery and retail stores have used them effectively during the pandemic. Eight out of every nine American workers don't have a union to represent them in workplace disputes. So thousands of them have been flocking to the nonprofit website Coworker.org in their fight for a fairer workplace.

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The tools of the Internet and a bit of public embarrassment can go a long way in drawing attention to a cause. Front-line workers at grocery and retail stores have used them effectively during the pandemic. Most of those workers aren't unionized, so they've been flocking to a nonprofit website to fight for a fair workplace. NPR's Reflect America fellow Ashish Valentine has more.

Heather Larson has enjoyed kayaking for several years. Before the pandemic, she'd often rent a kayak for the weekend and ride it at state parks in Illinois and nearby Wisconsin. But the Des Plaines, Ill., resident has had no luck finding one for the past three months.

Updated at 8:02 p.m. ET

Tribune Publishing, the parent company of local news outlets across the country from the Chicago Tribune to The Baltimore Sun, is closing the physical offices of five newspapers permanently.

Google, Facebook, Twitter and other major tech companies met with U.S. government officials on Wednesday to discuss their plans to counter disinformation on social media in the run-up to the November election.

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