Asma Khalid

Asma Khalid is a White House correspondent for NPR. She also co-hosts The NPR Politics Podcast.

Khalid is a bit of a campaign-trail addict, having reported on the 2014, 2016, 2018 and 2020 elections.

She joined NPR's Washington team in 2016 to focus on the intersection of demographics and politics.

During the 2020 presidential campaign, she covered the crowded Democratic primary field, and then went on to report on Joe Biden's candidacy.

Her reporting often dives into the political, cultural and racial divides in the country.

Before joining NPR's political team, Khalid was a reporter for Boston's NPR station WBUR, where she was nearly immediately flung into one of the most challenging stories of her career — the Boston Marathon bombings. She had joined the network just a few weeks prior, but went on to report on the bombings, the victims, and the reverberations throughout the city. She also covered Boston's failed Olympic bid and the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger.

Later, she led a new business and technology team at the station that reported on the future of work.

In addition to countless counties across America, Khalid's reporting has taken her to Pakistan, the United Kingdom and China.

She got her start in journalism in her home state of Indiana, but she fell in love with radio through an internship at the BBC Newshour in London during graduate school.

She's been a guest on numerous TV programs including ABC's This Week, CNN's Inside Politics and PBS's Washington Week.

Her reporting has been recognized with the Missouri Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism, as well as awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Gracie Award.

A native of Crown Point, Ind., Khalid is a graduate of Indiana University in Bloomington. She has also studied at the University of Cambridge, the London School of Economics, the American University in Beirut and Middlebury College's Arabic school.

A young boy who struggles to fit in at school, besties who are polar opposites and a middle school kid who learns to be himself through a school presentation — those are just a few of the stories that author LeUyen Pham thinks the middle schooler in your life (or frankly, just anyone who loves a good book) would enjoy. Pham has written and illustrated more than 100 books for kids, so we asked her to recommend some of her favorite reads for kids heading back to school.

Updated August 26, 2021 at 1:10 PM ET

In January 2002, when the U.S. Embassy in Afghanistan reopened for the first time since 1989, Ambassador Ryan Crocker said the first member of Congress to visit him in Kabul was the then-senator from Delaware, Joe Biden.

"One of his really great qualities, I thought, was his driving need to see things for himself ... and I just really respected that," Crocker said, pointing out that Biden also visited Iraq many times.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

DEBBIE ELLIOTT, HOST:

Maureen Nicholas says she had no ideal presidential candidate in the last election.

"I voted for Biden, but I didn't want to," the former Republican said as she walked across a Walmart parking lot in Easton, Pa.

Nicholas said that she personally feels lucky, but that the overall economy feels pretty bad these days.

"Price increases — astronomical," she said. "Health care — it just seems like it's out of control."

Updated August 5, 2021 at 7:08 PM ET

Major automakers and the Biden administration are mapping out a route toward a future where Americans drive a lot more electric vehicles.

President Biden, standing before a display of electric trucks and SUVs and surrounded by union officials and auto executives, signed an executive order Thursday setting a target that half of all new vehicles sold in the U.S. in 2030 be zero-emission cars, which would include plug-in hybrids.

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