Claudia Grisales

Claudia Grisales is a congressional reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk.

Before joining NPR in June 2019, she was a Capitol Hill reporter covering military affairs for Stars and Stripes. She also covered breaking news involving fallen service members and the Trump administration's relationship with the military. She also investigated service members who have undergone toxic exposures, such as the atomic veterans who participated nuclear bomb testing and subsequent cleanup operations.

Prior to Stars and Stripes, Grisales was an award-winning reporter at the daily newspaper in Central Texas, the Austin American-Statesman, for 16 years. There, she covered the intersection of business news and regulation, energy issues and public safety. She also conducted a years-long probe that uncovered systemic abuses and corruption at Pedernales Electric Cooperative, the largest member-owned utility in the country. The investigation led to the ousting of more than a dozen executives, state and U.S. congressional hearings and criminal convictions for two of the co-op's top leaders.

Grisales is originally from Chicago and is an alum of the University of Houston, the University of Texas and Syracuse University. At Syracuse, she attended the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she earned a master's degree in journalism.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

A new film tells the story of an American student studying abroad in France. She ends up in prison, accused of murdering her roommate. And her father, played by Matt Damon, goes on a pursuit to prove her innocence. If the story sounds familiar, it's because, as Vanity Fair put it, the director, Tom McCarthy, was, quote, "directly inspired by the Amanda Knox saga," a phrase Knox says inaccurately frames the truth about what happened.

The Senate has approved legislation to bestow Congress' highest honor, the Congressional Gold Medal, on the law enforcement officers who responded to the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The House passed the measure earlier this summer, and the bill now heads to President Biden's desk.

Majority Leader Chuck Schumer led the unanimous, bipartisan approval of the legislation on the Senate floor.

"I cannot imagine more worthy recipients than the men and women who put their lives on the line to defend this temple of democracy," said Schumer.

Updated July 29, 2021 at 4:29 PM ET

The U.S. Capitol Police are on the verge of running out of money next month so both the Senate and House approved a $2.1 billion spending measure on Thursday to avoid furloughs and pay for overtime, training and more. It also direct funds to federal agencies handling humanitarian aid for U.S. allies in Afghanistan.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

The House committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding its first hearing today to hear from four police officers who defended the Capitol that day.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

The new chief of the U.S. Capitol Police on Friday defended the beleaguered agency, saying that the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection should not define the department and that necessary changes to its procedures have been made in the months since.

"I know how good this U.S. Capitol Police Department is. I know the kind of work that these men and women have done over the years," Tom Manger, who has four decades of experience in law enforcement and who started in his new role on Friday, said in an interview with NPR.

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