Juana Summers

Juana Summers is a political reporter for NPR covering demographics and culture. She has covered politics since 2010 for publications including Politico, CNN and The Associated Press. She got her start in public radio at KBIA in Columbia, Mo., and also previously covered Congress for NPR.

She appears regularly on television and radio outlets to discuss national politics. In 2016, Summers was a fellow at Georgetown University's Institute of Politics and Public Service. Summers is also a competitive pinball player and sits on the board of the International Flipper Pinball Association (IFPA), the governing body for competitive pinball events around the world.

She is a graduate of the Missouri School of Journalism and a native of Kansas City, Mo.

When Sam Peterson enrolled at Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa, he found the college experience mind-boggling. So too, he says, was figuring out how to vote in the 2018 midterm elections.

"Even though I had helped out with voter registration drives, I still felt confused about how to register. I didn't know what voting by mail was or absentee voting was," said Peterson, who is now 21 and a fellow with the left-leaning NextGen Iowa. "So then, I was just really overwhelmed with school and with this voting thing, and so I didn't vote in 2018."

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee is launching a seven-figure advertising investment aimed at mobilizing Black voters — with a particular eye toward Black men — across nearly a dozen states, a strategic move by House Democrats' campaign committee to further energize the key demographic as the election season heads into its final weeks.

The advertisements — a mix of radio, print, digital and mail — are being deployed across targeted congressional districts in Arkansas, Georgia, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia.

President Trump referred to California Sen. Kamala Harris as "this monster" in an interview on Thursday, a continuation of his pattern of attacking Black women with demeaning insults. The president has previously reserved the term "monster" for terrorists, murders and major natural disasters.

The White House is struggling on Monday to show that it has a burgeoning public health and political crisis under control as President Trump enters his third day of aggressive and experimental treatment for the coronavirus.

In an election season where get out the vote messaging is seemingly ceaseless, a 90-second video featuring more than a half dozen dancers testifying to the importance of down ballot races may be the most provocative.

In the video, a woman in knee high, lace up boots walks away from the camera, toward a stage decorated with patriotic bunting. She wraps one of her hands around a silver pole.

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