All Things Considered

Weekdays at 3 pm and weekends at 5 pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations. In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

Every family has that story it tells a million times. For NPR's student Podcast Challenge winner Miriam Colvin, that story is of a family friend boxing against an unknown up-and-comer: Cassius Clay.

As former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin awaits sentencing after his conviction on three counts of murder in the death of George Floyd, policymakers in Minneapolis are trying to figure out how to improve policing.

Concurrently, the Justice Department has launched an investigation into the city's police department to address possible patterns of discrimination and excessive force.

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Patrick Oppmann, a CNN reporter based in Havana, about what it means for Cuba that a Castro is not at the helm for the first time in more than sixty years.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with cookbook writer Nigella Lawson about her latest book Cook, Eat, Repeat and how to stop viewing cooking as tedious and, instead, find peace in the kitchen.

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