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  • Hosted by Rachel Martin

Conceived as a cross between a Sunday newspaper and CBS' Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt, Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. The program has covered news events from Nelson Mandela's 1990 release from a South African prison to the capture of Saddam Hussein.

Weekend Edition Sunday debuted on January 18, 1987, with host Susan Stamberg. Two years later, Liane Hansen took over the host chair, a position she held for 22 years. In that time, Hansen interviewed movers and shakers in politics, science, business and the arts. Her reporting travels took her from the slums of Cairo to the iron mines of Michigan's Upper Peninsula; from the oyster beds on the bayou in Houma, La., to Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park; and from the kitchens of Colonial Williamsburg, Va., to the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated.

In the fall of 2011, NPR National Desk Reporter Audie Cornish began hosting the show. During 2012, Audie took an assignment filling in for Michele Norris as host of All Things Considered alongside Robert Siegel and Melissa Block. National Security Correspondent Rachel Martin is hosting in the interim.

Every week listeners tune in to hear a unique blend of news, features and the regularly scheduled puzzle segment with Puzzlemaster Will Shortz, the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times.

Weekend Edition Sunday is heard on NPR Member stations across the United States and around the globe via NPR Worldwide. The conversation between the audience and the program staff continues throughout the social media world.

Saying Goodbye to Hollywood's Cinerama Dome

Apr 18, 2021

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Once upon a time, if you wanted to go see a movie in Hollywood, there were few better places to go than the Cinerama Dome. When it was built in 1963, it was the first new movie palace there in decades.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

For more than a year, Alden Global Capital's attempt to take over the Tribune Publishing Company, which owns papers like the Chicago Tribune, has gained momentum. But as NPR's David Folkenflik reports, that bid is now in doubt.

Arooj Aftab's music and compositions are like listening to a soundscape of her home country, Pakistan. Featuring recitations of poems and themes of grief and longing, Vulture Prince is Aftab's third album, out on April 23 via New Amsterdam Records.

Arooj Aftab spoke with NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro about the loss of her younger brother, honoring the music you inherit with integrity, and the solace of sound. Hear the radio version at the audio link, and read on for an edited transcript.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Why do sweets make your stomach hurt? What happened to the dinosaurs? "Club Mundo Kids" has the answers.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "CLUB MUNDO KIDS")

ROMINA PUGA: (Speaking Spanish).

On-air Challenge: I'm going to read you some clues. The answer to each one is one of the words in the clue with its vowel sound changed.

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