Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

Updated March 31, 2021 at 8:17 AM ET

New clinical trials showed that Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine elicits "100% efficacy and robust antibody responses" in adolescents from 12 to 15 years old, the drug company announced Wednesday. The trial included 2,260 participants; the results are even better than earlier responses from participants ages 16 to 25.

The young woman whose cellphone video showed former police officer Derek Chauvin holding his knee on George Floyd's neck says she was drawn to the curb in Minneapolis by the sight of "a man terrified, scared, begging for his life."

"It wasn't right," she said. "He was suffering, he was in pain."

Updated March 30, 2021 at 3:24 PM ET

Donald Williams, who watched police officers pin George Floyd to the ground last Memorial Day, says that after an ambulance took Floyd away, he called 911 to report a crime – a killing that he says was carried out by former officer Derek Chauvin and his colleagues.

When asked in court Tuesday why he called the emergency number, Williams said, "Because I believe I witnessed a murder." He added, "I felt the need to call the police on the police."

Derek Chauvin's trial on murder charges will see several significant battles over how essential facts in the case are interpreted, the former Minneapolis police officer's defense attorney, Eric Nelson, said during Monday's opening arguments.

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin broke departmental rules and showed a disregard for the life of George Floyd when he pinned Floyd down in the street last year, the prosecution said in opening arguments of Chauvin's murder trial Monday.

"You will learn that on May 25 of 2020, Mr. Derek Chauvin betrayed this badge when he used excessive and unreasonable force upon the body of Mr. George Floyd," Special Assistant Attorney General Jerry Blackwell told the jury.

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