Claudia Grisales

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The U.S. House of Representatives approved a criminal contempt report against Steve Bannon, an ally of former President Donald Trump, for defying a subpoena from a House panel probing the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

The 229-202 vote in the Democratic-controlled chamber was largely along party lines, with nine GOP members joining Democrats.

It followed a day of contentious debate, with Democrats and Republicans trading barbs.

Updated October 19, 2021 at 9:13 PM ET

The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday evening unanimously approved a criminal contempt report against Steve Bannon, an ally of former President Donald Trump's, for defying a subpoena from the panel.

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Updated October 15, 2021 at 12:37 PM ET

After failing to show for a deposition on Thursday, the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol said it would move forward with criminal contempt proceedings against Trump ally and political strategist Steve Bannon.

Meanwhile, three other former Trump administration officials will have their depositions postponed, according to a committee aide.

Updated October 13, 2021 at 6:55 PM ET

The Democratic-led House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol issued a subpoena Wednesday for an ex-Justice Department official who had promised to pursue former President Donald Trump's false election fraud claims.

As moderate Democrats pressure their party to scale back their partisan $3.5 trillion social spending package, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said Tuesday that the way forward could involve shortening the shelf life of several major programs in the plan to bring down the overall price tag.

Updated October 8, 2021 at 3:21 PM ET

The White House is authorizing the National Archives to share a set of documents with the Democratic-led House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol, press secretary Jen Psaki said Friday.

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Missouri Democratic Rep. Cori Bush was trying to regain her composure in her congressional office.

Just moments earlier, the former nurse and activist had, in a House hearing, shared her personal story of her sexual assault and subsequent abortion for the first time.

"I was reading really slowly because I was having trouble just even opening my mouth. It was just very hard. It felt like something was pressing down on me," Bush recounted to NPR. "It was really difficult because I'm telling this story before the world."

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Who is to blame for the shambolic U.S. exit from Afghanistan? NPR's Claudia Grisales reports on two days of congressional testimony from top military leaders.

Updated September 29, 2021 at 7:01 PM ET

The Democratic-led House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday issued subpoenas to 11 individuals who were said to have played a role organizing the rally that preceded the deadly attack on the complex.

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Updated September 27, 2021 at 4:02 PM ET

Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., a key player in the House Democratic caucus, has launched a campaign to be the next mayor of Los Angeles.

"With my whole heart, I'm ready," Bass announced in a tweet Monday afternoon. "Let's do this — together. I'm running for mayor."

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Senate parliamentarian Elizabeth MacDonough has ruled against Democrats' efforts to include a massive immigration reform effort in their $3.5 trillion proposed spending bill, dealing the party a setback that very likely closes the door on efforts to include a pathway to citizenship in the partisan legislation.

Updated September 16, 2021 at 10:38 AM ET

With a far-right rally planned for Washington, D.C., on Saturday, the Capitol will face its first large-scale security test since the Jan. 6 attack on the seat of American democracy.

Updated September 14, 2021 at 4:36 PM ET

Senate Democrats have reached a deal on revised voting rights legislation, but a major roadblock remains in the evenly divided chamber with Republicans ready to halt the bill's progress.

Congressional leaders and top security officials say the U.S. Capitol will be well-prepared for a far-right rally expected for the area on Saturday, including plans to reinstall perimeter fencing that was up for months after the Jan. 6 insurrection.

This weekend's rally will present law enforcement officials with the first large-scale security test to the Capitol since the attack on the complex by a pro-Trump mob.

Two bipartisan senators — Democrat Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and Republican Mitt Romney of Utah — want the Biden administration to step up their work protecting Afghan journalists in the wake of the U.S. exit from their country.

Klobuchar and Romney said that following the end of formal operations in Afghanistan, the Afghan journalists who assisted U.S. media personnel need urgent aid resettling and continuing their work.

The Democratic-led House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol has issued orders to 35 social media and communications companies to preserve records, as the panel continues to expand its probe into the deadly riot.

Updated August 25, 2021 at 8:50 PM ET

The House select committee charged with investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol has issued a wave of record requests targeting communications by former President Donald Trump and his top officials in the lead-up to the deadly riot.

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A new film tells the story of an American student studying abroad in France. She ends up in prison, accused of murdering her roommate. And her father, played by Matt Damon, goes on a pursuit to prove her innocence. If the story sounds familiar, it's because, as Vanity Fair put it, the director, Tom McCarthy, was, quote, "directly inspired by the Amanda Knox saga," a phrase Knox says inaccurately frames the truth about what happened.

The Senate has approved legislation to bestow Congress' highest honor, the Congressional Gold Medal, on the law enforcement officers who responded to the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The House passed the measure earlier this summer, and the bill now heads to President Biden's desk.

Majority Leader Chuck Schumer led the unanimous, bipartisan approval of the legislation on the Senate floor.

"I cannot imagine more worthy recipients than the men and women who put their lives on the line to defend this temple of democracy," said Schumer.

Updated July 29, 2021 at 4:29 PM ET

The U.S. Capitol Police are on the verge of running out of money next month so both the Senate and House approved a $2.1 billion spending measure on Thursday to avoid furloughs and pay for overtime, training and more. It also direct funds to federal agencies handling humanitarian aid for U.S. allies in Afghanistan.

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The House committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding its first hearing today to hear from four police officers who defended the Capitol that day.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

The new chief of the U.S. Capitol Police on Friday defended the beleaguered agency, saying that the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection should not define the department and that necessary changes to its procedures have been made in the months since.

"I know how good this U.S. Capitol Police Department is. I know the kind of work that these men and women have done over the years," Tom Manger, who has four decades of experience in law enforcement and who started in his new role on Friday, said in an interview with NPR.

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